Nelson Marshmallow Sofa

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Nelson Marshmallow Sofa

Herman Miller

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Nelson Marshmallow Sofa | Highlight image
This upholstered sofa has 18 circular cushions on the back and seat, a brushed-finish tubular-steel frame, and black-satin-finish legs.

If only all design "failures" were so successful. The inspiration for the Nelson Marshmallow Sofa (1956) was launched when an inventor approached George Nelson and Irving Harper with a planned "self-skinned" injection plastic disc that would be inexpensive to produce and unerringly durable. As the proposed cushions had a maximum diameter of 12 inches, the designers perched 18 of them atop a steel frame. Sadly, the inventor's vision for high-resiliency, low-cost cushions never came to fruition, but the design was so compelling that Herman Miller chose to produce it anyway. With both residential and commercial applications in mind, the design features detachable cushions that are both easy to clean and interchangeable to equalize wear. The atom-like appearance of the Marshmallow Sofa is a precursor to the aesthetic style of the pop art of the 1960s. This original is an authentic, fully licensed product of Herman Miller, Inc. Nelson is a trademark of Herman Miller, Inc.

Nelson Marshmallow Sofa

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Designer
Category
Status
For Order
Vendor Item

56701R05

Availability

No product available in any showroom.
For inquiries, please contact us at +6692 015 8888 or LINE: @chanintrwork.

Dimensions (cm)

W132 x D73.7 x H78.7

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George Nelson

George Nelson

George Nelson was born in Hartford in 1908. He studied architecture at Yale University. A fellowship enabled him to study at the American Academy in Rome from 1932 to 1934. In Europe, he became acquainted with the major architectural works and leading protagonists of modernism. As a design director at Herman Miller, He also opened his own design office in 1947, George Nelson Associates, Inc., worked together with such outstanding employees to create countless products and objects, some of which are now regarded as icons of mid-century modernism. George Nelson died in New York in 1986.
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